How Bike Cameras Can Help Cyclists

Have you been thinking about getting a camera for your bike but don’t know which one to buy?

Learn the value of video footage in collision investigations and court cases according to #TheCyclistLawyer:

“Most law enforcement offices I’ve talked with say this evidence is hugely helpful to them in their collision investigation so long as footage does show the face of the driver. Of course, any other info like the car make/model/plates and the location, timestamps, etc all play a role in the investigation as well. But imagine a collision with no witnesses and a cyclist who is knocked unconscious… the video can be so powerful. It can make the case.”


I recently got the following note:

“Megan, we met several times at different lectures. It’s always reassuring to know you have cyclists back. My question is more for my information and if ever needed your benefit.

Concerning riding with a GoPro. If I have only one camera to use while riding which mounting do you find most useful in court – 1) back view of the bike from the seat post, 2) front view of the bike on the handle bars, or 3) front view of the bike on the rider’s helmet?

Also, I’m wondering if you have any feedback on having the camera on the back – will motorists see it there and tend to think twice before passing the rider?

In this day and age I don’t believe you can have enough leverage in a dispute.

Thanks for your time – I hope to never need your services. Sounds weird.”

Great questions. Let’s discuss the placement of the camera if a rider only has one, and cannot place both a front-racing and rear-facing camera. (Because yes, two cameras can be quite expensive).

There is no truly right or wrong answer to this question, it’s more a strategic decision by the rider. Based on our firm’s caseload over the years, the vast majority of cases we handle are of three types (which also jive with the state and national bike crash stats):

  1. Motorist makes left turn directly in front of/into the oncoming cyclist (failure to yield on left turn)
  2. Motorist makes right turn from a position parallel to the cyclist, either into the bike or directly in front of the cyclist (right hook)
  3. Motorist strikes cyclist from behind/side swipes cyclist from behind (does not allow proper passing distance/3 feet/fails to see cyclist at all/impaired/distracted driving)

 

Complete post from Roadbikereview.com here

Check out these bike camera reviews on CyclingTips.com

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