A message from the Boulder Valley Velodrome and their new FAQ


Photo Credit: Bvvelodrome Facebook

From Boulder Valley Velodrome

A Message From Doug & Frank (April, 2014)
“In 2004, when Frank Banta and I hatched our idea to build a velodrome, we stole the movie line from “Field of Dreams” as our mantra: “If you build it, they will come.” In 2007, we traveled to Toluca, Mexico, to meet our track designer, Peter Junek. He was completing a 250-meter track, and we were lucky enough to be there when it was ready to ride. I had never been on a velodrome, but I always knew I would like it. Peter and I hopped on the track and did about twenty laps. It was exhilarating. I stopped, looked at Frank, and said, “We’re building a velodrome, and I don’t care if anyone comes”. Although my statement was heartfelt, we actually do want you to join us. It will be a little lonely riding by ourselves, anyway.” – Doug Emerson


1. When will the track be open?
2. Can I still become a Founding Member?
3. Can you explain the structure for the 10 regular clubs?
4. Are there club slots still available?
5. How can I get on the track if I’m not in one of the original ten clubs?
6. What will go on in the winter?
and a handful more

Read the responses to the questions above at Boulder Valley Velodrome

News Item: 

8 Comments

Pricey

So if I read this correctly I will need to pay $250 to take classes so I will actually be able to ride on the track. There is no mention as to how much it might cost once I am "certified" to ride the track. I understand that its a business and they want to make money and I am willing to pay but $250 for 8 classes seems like alot. I really hope the velodrome makes it. Good Luck!

Huh...

So I know in practice this may be easier to understand but I have to say Huh??...
I am not sure you could make that more confusing if you tried. As a person that has never tried the track I can tell you that paying $250 for 8 class instruction is going to pretty much price out people who may be slightly interested. I totally get running a business and I really wish them well. I will probably watch some races up there but the other forms of cycling are so much more accessible I don't know why anyone would want to "try" this at that type of cost.
You can "try" a road race, mtb race or cx race for less then $50 bucks.

Getting on the Velodrome

I agree, some of the info is confusing. That's too bad if it's keeping people from understanding what's going on and how they can join the fun.

As to cost, if you're used to riding the roads with no fees attached, it may seem pricey. Track isn't for everyone, it's a unique type of cycling you can't get elsewhere. Unfortunately, while the city is willing to build a bike park, and there is funding to build trails and bike lanes on highways, nobody from the government side has stepped up to build or co-support a velodrome.

But Doug and Frank did. It cost a bundle, they have taken financial risks, now they are inviting folks to come out and enjoy that unique niche of cycling.

The rationale for certification is easy to understand if you've ridden track before. It's a complicated, fast-moving environment where your training to operate as expected is critical to your safety and that of others. Once you are out there, you will be glad the other riders are certified as well. I got crashed out by an uncertified rider at the indoor track we had in Boulder, not good.

The track can handle about 30 or so riders at a time. It's important to sort out the schedule and find a way to get as many paid riders on as possible, that's why they have built the team programs. Having a full track is what pays the bills. I'm pretty sure any profits will be small, but the risk is huge (we can all do the math).

This velodrome started 6 years ago and Frank and Doug have kept the faith in spite of unbelievable obstacles. With ski tickets over $100 these days, the velodrome isn't really pricey by comparison. It's just the reality of the costs to build, manage, insure, etc. a quality facility. I'm not an owner or investor, just telling it like I see it.

Excessive

8 classes just to get "certified" is very excessive. Very excessive. BVV just eliminated 95% of potential new track business. BIG hurdle to get involved and certainly very limited open time slots to ride when most of the time will be blocked out for "founders".

“If you build it, they will come” just doesn't happen these days. You have to offer a quality product and a good price.

I don't think ANY time is

I don't think ANY time is blocked out for Founders, only for clubs. The relatively modest group of Founders ($5000 upfront commitment) will have the right to be on the track much of the time, but that doesn't keep others off.

There is some validity to your points about 8 classes for certification being too much. I'll have to be certified just like everyone else, even though I have some track background. I too would prefer it to be less but have accepted it. I can also envision many riders for whom 8 sessions is barely enough! I hope and expect that with experience the track finds the right balance between safety/education and access, and their programs will reflect that.

I'm assuming your claim of 95% of potential new track business being eliminated is opinion, or do you have stats to back that up? What is lacking in the product in your eyes? And what is a good price? I ask because I'm in marketing and find that objective critical insights are always valuable, while casual opinions don't offer much guidance in driving a product's success. Since you have "Ben A Round" it would be great to hear the rationale for your thoughts.

I don't think ANY time is

I don't think ANY time is blocked out for Founders, only for clubs. The relatively modest group of Founders ($5000 upfront commitment) will have the right to be on the track much of the time, but that doesn't keep others off.

There is some validity to your points about 8 classes for certification being too much. I'll have to be certified just like everyone else, even though I have some track background. I too would prefer it to be less but have accepted it. I can also envision many riders for whom 8 sessions is barely enough! I hope and expect that with experience the track finds the right balance between safety/education and access, and their programs will reflect that.

I'm assuming your claim of 95% of potential new track business being eliminated is opinion, or do you have stats to back that up? What is lacking in the product in your eyes? And what is a good price? I ask because I'm in marketing and find that objective critical insights are always valuable, while casual opinions don't offer much guidance in driving a product's success. Since you have "Ben A Round" it would be great to hear the rationale for your thoughts.

BIC Rider

Does riding for three years on the Boulder Indoor Cycling Velodrome count? Would love to ride out in Erie once a month, on the 250m V-Drome, but am not going to sign up for a 8 week class or buy a USAC/BRAC license just to do it.