Featured Stories

  • Bike Stolen, Recovered and the Garmin might help catch the Thief!

    So a bike gets stolen in Boulder, nothing new there but this incident is unlike any other I've ever heard of. Guy goes to Amante in North Boulder to meet some friends for an early morning ride. He puts his S-Works on the rack just like many have done thousands of times before. While inside waiting for his friends to arrive a guy in jeans takes off on his bike heading south on Broadway. A customer notifies the owner but by that time it was too late.

    End of story right?

    Owner goes on a social media rampage to find his bike and someone mentions they had seen it and tells him the location. He proceeds to the location and recovers the bike.

    Social Media saves the day! But it's not over yet.

    So the bike was equipped with Garmin and the entire route the bike was on is tracked. Cool.

    Here is where it REALLY gets interesting With the help of the Boulder Police they will take the timestamps from the Garmin of the location where the bike was as it was traveling down Broadway and see if they can match it up with the stop light's cameras in order to get a better visual description of the assailant.

    WOW, Garmin is at work! Read all about the details of the Amante Stolen Bike


    Left is the beginning and right is where the bike ended up.

  • Stages Cycling® launches indoor cycling brand with new SC Series bikes

    Draws from founding-staff’s indoor cycling roots to redefine commercial indoor cycling category.
    For immediate release, March 11, 2015, Boulder, CO— Stages Cycling® extends its brand with the launch of Stages Indoor Cycling and the new SC Series—a line of commercial and high-end retail indoor cycling bikes, which bring an array of breakthrough features to redefine the category of indoor cycling.

    The SC Series launches with two models: the flagship, SC3, with many innovations, including the Stages Power® meter—the same power measurement system that reshaped the outdoor cycling power meter category. A second model, the SC2, is the same in all respects but does not include the Stages Power meter.

    The SC Series bikes share two never before seen concepts, which have patents pending: SprintShift™ and FitLoc™. SprintShift is a dual-action resistance adjustment, which pairs a traditional micro-adjust dial with a three-position macro-adjust lever. The SprintShift lever allows large, consistent jumps in resistance for intervals and rest. FitLoc replaces the standard twist-to-lock pop-pin height adjustments with a new cam operated pop-pin, making fit adjustments for height lightning fast.

    These new innovations are paired with the accuracy, consistency, and reliability of thepro-peloton-proven Stages Power meter on the SC3 model, which sports Stages new rider-powered EcoSCRN™ console. EcoSCRN uses a hub dynamometer, rather than batteries, to make it the ultimate bike for a data driven studio or cyclist. The Stages Power measurement system provides unprecedented accuracy in power measurement, enabling studios the ability to now train their clients ‘indoors and outdoors’ with the same technology.

    “The SC Series has the potential to be a benchmark,” said Pat Warner, the product director for Stages Cycling, who spent 20 years working on indoor cycling bikes in the Fitness industry prior to Stages. “We’ve addressed every major issue we’ve ever seen with an indoor bike. SC3 is certainly worthy of our ‘flagship’ status, with features like Stages Power, SprintShift, FitLoc, and our RoadBar™. But we’ve also nailed the basics on these bikes, and we’re confident that the ride feel, lack of maintenance, and reliability of the bike will be the features that actually set the benchmark for both the facility owner and the instructor.”

    Both of Stages Cycling’s flagship SC3 and SC2 bikes utilize the new CarbonGlyde™ drive system. CarbonGlyde builds on the unparalleled reliability and lack of maintenance offered by Gates® Carbon Drive™ carbon fiber belt, with a 5:1 gear ratio and high-inertia flywheel to provide for one of the smoothest, most realistic rides available indoors.

    “Stages Indoor Cycling is a new company and new brand,” said Jim Liggett, the general manager of Stages Cycling. “We will be attractive to club and studio customers who are seeking to expand their base business within their Indoor Cycling group exercise offering. Our success with Stages Power has passed the test of professional cycling and we offer this, tested, Stages Power meter to indoor athletes. We feel the combination of a completely new bike with uniquely new features, and our Stages Power meter, allows facilities to offer their members the next category breakthrough. Stages Cycling is a company rooted in cycling. Our goal is to help create indoor cycling athletes who can achieve their dreams in fitness or in cycling.”

    “We also realize that—while we know and do power better than anyone in the Fitness industry—some cycling studios have a different focus. So we’re bringing the SC series to market with two flagship bikes, one with the Stages Power meter, and one without, so that we’re prepared to meet every indoor rider, and every indoor facility on their own preferred terms.”

    Stages Cycling will show the SC Series bike line for the first time publicly in Los Angeles, at the Los Angeles Convention center on March 12 and 13 at Booth 2735 in IHRSA 2015 International Convention and Trade show.

    For more information regarding the Stages SC Series bikes, visit: http://www.stagesindoorcyling.com

  • Cyclist shot by a BB Gun from a car near Lyons
    Hey Kris,

    Monika and I were riding north on HWY 36 towards HWY 66 around 2pm yesterday. At about 1/4 mile from the intersection I felt a sharp sting in my left butt cheek. At the same time a black chevy avalanche came speeding past and I saw the person in the back seat pulling what looked like a gun into the car. At that moment I realized that this person shot me with a BB gun. I tried to chase them into Lyons but could not find them once I got to Lyons.

    Getting hit with a BB gun feels not unlike a bee sting but the pain subsides and does not have that lingering effect that the bee venom has.

    I feel frustrated and vulnerable that someone felt the need to shoot at me. I am glad though that they just hit me with a BB gun and not their car, that would have ended much worse.
    It is baffling that people think it is ok to use cyclists as target practice.
    I filed a police report in case someone else was shot at. Unfortunately i did not get the plates.

    Hope you are well,
    Marcel

  • Team 303 and MS Awareness Week - Multiple Sclerosis Treatments

    From 303triathlon.com

    Thanks for the donations yesterday! We’re now at $4890, just $110 from our MS Awareness week goal of reaching $5000 raised towards our $10,000 goal. Here’s the link to join our team or donate. Of course we’d love to exceed this goal!

    Today’s topic is MS treatments, and it’s a bit of a long post, but I think an interesting one! In order to be treated, somone first has to be diagnosed. Once a diagnosis is made, the patient and their neurologist usually have to figure out the best course of treatment(s). Now, I’m going to step back a bit, as something that I didn’t mention in earlier posts is that there is more than one kind of MS. (Though it’s up for debate if it’s all one kind, just different severities and where you happen land upon the “progression spectrum” when you are diagnosed.)

    Most people with MS are initially diagnosed with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS), which means you might have a flare-up (attack on the CNS), then it resolves (the remitting part) and you may not even notice any symptoms. Then months or even years later, you get a relapse, followed by another remission, though this time it might leave some more lingering effects due to the CNS damage. This course of the disease is a series of relapses and remissions, and the more that occur, the more damage that is taking place to your CNS. The goal here is to reduce or eliminate these relapses so the person with MS goes on with their normal.

    The other kind of MS are called progressive types - where you don’t have the remission phase and symptoms just continually worsen over time. It’s Primary Progressive if this is what you are first diagnosed with, Secondary Progressive if you first went through a relapsing-remitting phase. There are currently no FDA approved treatments for progressive MS, so this is where research dollars really can help!

    Back to treatment of RRMS. I’ll start with the drug therapies. There are 12 FDA approved drugs for RRMS, two of which were approved in 2014. The majority of them are injectable, a few are delivered via infusion, and more recently, oral medications have become available. The first interferon treatment was approved in 1993. That’s really not that long ago! I won’t go into how all these work, but for the most part, because MS is an immune-mediated issue, the medications suppress the immune system in some way. There are also a lot of potential side-effects, so careful patient screening must be done to make sure the chosen treatment is first appropriate for the patient, and second, the side effects are tolerated.

    Treating MS goes beyond just trying to modify the disease course. (The meds are often called disease modifying drugs - recall there is no cure at this time, just hope to slow down the progression.) Often the symptoms need to be treated as well to help with quality of life. Imagine if you had bladder control issues due to MS. You’d probably want to figure out a way to manage that a bit. Also if you have balance or muscle control issues, you might go to physical therapy to work on improving muscle coordination. Or if you were dealing with mood issues, you might see a counselor or therapist. Or if your speech was impacted, you’d visit a speech therapist. The list goes on! And I can’t forget to add that a good diet of real/whole foods and regular exercise also is a recommended addition to any other treatment, not to mention things like massage or acupuncture to help the body feel better.

    Additionally, relapses are sometimes treated with high doses of steroids to help the person regain function more quickly. If you can’t see or can’t walk, it’s likely your doctor will get you on steroids (usually methyl-prednisolone) as soon as possible. What’s interesting is that it doesn’t change where you will end up in terms of symptoms, but rather gets you there faster.

    You can hopefully see how MS is a complicated disease due to the effects of damage to the CNS, and the treatments can be complicated

    More from the National MS Society on Treating MS

    Note from Nicole:
    I’m on one of the new oral treatments called Gilenya. It’s got some side effects (higher blood pressure and it lowered my max heart rate, in addition to the “internal” ones I can’t see without a blood test, such as lowered white blood cell count and changes to liver function), but I hope it’s doing its job! With MS medication, you typically don’t know if it’s “working”, you just have to monitor the number of relapses you have and hope you don’t have as many (or any!)

    To get on this medication, I had to go through a variety of tests to make sure I was a candidate, and being relatively young and otherwise healthy, all looked good. Then to start I had to do a “first dose observation,” where I spent over 6 hours in a contracted urgent care facility to make sure I didn’t have any adverse reactions to the medication. Because it affects the heart, they wanted to make sure my heart rate didn’t get too low and the electrical signals in my heart were still OK. So I got an EKG, swallowed the pill, and then sat in a room where the staff came in every hour to measure my pulse and blood pressure. I had another EKG before they sent me home. Pretty boring, so I invited friends to take shifts and hang out with me, and "borrowed" the lab coat that was hanging on the door!

    So far all seems to be going relatively well, though for all you in my age group, I am a little slower due to the hip surgeries and lowered max heart rate. That’s my excuse anyway!

    And don't forget - ride with us or donate!

  • Team 303 and MS Awareness Week - Multiple Sclerosis Treatments

    From 303triathlon.com

    Thanks for the donations yesterday! We’re now at $4890, just $110 from our MS Awareness week goal of reaching $5000 raised towards our $10,000 goal. Here’s the link to join our team or donate. Of course we’d love to exceed this goal!

    Today’s topic is MS treatments, and it’s a bit of a long post, but I think an interesting one! In order to be treated, somone first has to be diagnosed. Once a diagnosis is made, the patient and their neurologist usually have to figure out the best course of treatment(s). Now, I’m going to step back a bit, as something that I didn’t mention in earlier posts is that there is more than one kind of MS. (Though it’s up for debate if it’s all one kind, just different severities and where you happen land upon the “progression spectrum” when you are diagnosed.)

    Most people with MS are initially diagnosed with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS), which means you might have a flare-up (attack on the CNS), then it resolves (the remitting part) and you may not even notice any symptoms. Then months or even years later, you get a relapse, followed by another remission, though this time it might leave some more lingering effects due to the CNS damage. This course of the disease is a series of relapses and remissions, and the more that occur, the more damage that is taking place to your CNS. The goal here is to reduce or eliminate these relapses so the person with MS goes on with their normal.

    The other kind of MS are called progressive types - where you don’t have the remission phase and symptoms just continually worsen over time. It’s Primary Progressive if this is what you are first diagnosed with, Secondary Progressive if you first went through a relapsing-remitting phase. There are currently no FDA approved treatments for progressive MS, so this is where research dollars really can help!

    Back to treatment of RRMS. I’ll start with the drug therapies. There are 12 FDA approved drugs for RRMS, two of which were approved in 2014. The majority of them are injectable, a few are delivered via infusion, and more recently, oral medications have become available. The first interferon treatment was approved in 1993. That’s really not that long ago! I won’t go into how all these work, but for the most part, because MS is an immune-mediated issue, the medications suppress the immune system in some way. There are also a lot of potential side-effects, so careful patient screening must be done to make sure the chosen treatment is first appropriate for the patient, and second, the side effects are tolerated.

    Treating MS goes beyond just trying to modify the disease course. (The meds are often called disease modifying drugs - recall there is no cure at this time, just hope to slow down the progression.) Often the symptoms need to be treated as well to help with quality of life. Imagine if you had bladder control issues due to MS. You’d probably want to figure out a way to manage that a bit. Also if you have balance or muscle control issues, you might go to physical therapy to work on improving muscle coordination. Or if you were dealing with mood issues, you might see a counselor or therapist. Or if your speech was impacted, you’d visit a speech therapist. The list goes on! And I can’t forget to add that a good diet of real/whole foods and regular exercise also is a recommended addition to any other treatment, not to mention things like massage or acupuncture to help the body feel better.

    Additionally, relapses are sometimes treated with high doses of steroids to help the person regain function more quickly. If you can’t see or can’t walk, it’s likely your doctor will get you on steroids (usually methyl-prednisolone) as soon as possible. What’s interesting is that it doesn’t change where you will end up in terms of symptoms, but rather gets you there faster.

    You can hopefully see how MS is a complicated disease due to the effects of damage to the CNS, and the treatments can be complicated

    More from the National MS Society on Treating MS

    Note from Nicole:
    I’m on one of the new oral treatments called Gilenya. It’s got some side effects (higher blood pressure and it lowered my max heart rate, in addition to the “internal” ones I can’t see without a blood test, such as lowered white blood cell count and changes to liver function), but I hope it’s doing its job! With MS medication, you typically don’t know if it’s “working”, you just have to monitor the number of relapses you have and hope you don’t have as many (or any!)

    To get on this medication, I had to go through a variety of tests to make sure I was a candidate, and being relatively young and otherwise healthy, all looked good. Then to start I had to do a “first dose observation,” where I spent over 6 hours in a contracted urgent care facility to make sure I didn’t have any adverse reactions to the medication. Because it affects the heart, they wanted to make sure my heart rate didn’t get too low and the electrical signals in my heart were still OK. So I got an EKG, swallowed the pill, and then sat in a room where the staff came in every hour to measure my pulse and blood pressure. I had another EKG before they sent me home. Pretty boring, so I invited friends to take shifts and hang out with me, and "borrowed" the lab coat that was hanging on the door!

    So far all seems to be going relatively well, though for all you in my age group, I am a little slower due to the hip surgeries and lowered max heart rate. That’s my excuse anyway!

    And don't forget - ride with us or donate!