Eszter Horanyi Rides to a Record at the 2013 Iditarod Trail Invitational

Girls & Gears talks Fatbikes

Danielle Musto talked with Eszter Horanyi about her successful 350-mile Iditarod Trail Invitational in February. Eszter discussed training, nutrition, sleeping, and everything else that went into the race.

Eszter Horanyi is an accomplished ultra-endurance who has recently ridden to record-setting efforts in some of the toughest races in cycling. In 2012, she raced for 19 days, 3 hours, and 35 minutes to take 7th overall among 105 starters and cement a new women's record on the 2,745 mile Tour Divide. Earlier in 2012, Eszter took on the Arrowhead 135 in International Falls, MN, finishing 9th among all 60 riders who started the race, breaking the women's record by two hours. She currently holds the women's record in the 470-mile Colorado Trail Race. In the summer of 2011, she finished 5th out of 37 finishers in 5 days, 5 hours, and 27 minutes.


Eszter has recently combined two of her interests - fatbikes and bikepacking. She's combined her talent, grit, and strong endurance experience to be a strong racer at the Iditarod Trail Invitational in the Alaskan wilderness. The Iditarod, long known as only a dog sled race, has become the ultimate fatbike race for many. The race website (www.alaskaultrasport.com) describes the race as:

"Alaska Ultra Sport's Iditarod Trail Invitational is the world's longest human powered winter ultra-marathon. The race begins in Knik, Alaska and follows the Iditarod Trail to McGrath, Alaska for the finish of the three hundred fifty mile "short race". Racers competing in the eleven hundred mile version will continue up the trail to Nome, Alaska.

The only support provided to the racers is two snowmachines in front of the leaders as far as McGrath insuring a broken trail once and seven checkpoints where food and lodging are available. We supply three food drops along the route:

Fingerlake (mile 130) Rohn (mile 210) and in Cripple(even numbered years) or Iditarod ( odd numbered years) for the Nome racers. Between checkpoints racers have each other. Racers continuing to Nome are completely on their own except for one food drop provided by the race between McGrath and Ruby. They use village stores or send packages to the village post offices to re-supply with food and fuel for their stoves. Schools are often the only place to spend the night inside a building along the route to Nome."
Listen to an excerpt of the episode here:

To listen to the entire episode, go here: http://www.mountainbikeradio.com/girls-gears/eszter-horanyi/


About Girls & Gears:

"Girls & Gears" is the only women's specific mountain biking show out there! Danielle Musto hosts the show and brings the world of women's mountain biking to you! Show topics will vary from gear talk, to interviews with women, to female-specific training. Anything women are interested in, it'll be here!

For more episodes, check out the show page: http://www.mountainbikeradio.com/girls-gears/

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